The pope and coffee

The origins of coffee are in Ethiopia around the 10th century. It then spread to the Middle East and then reached Europe in the 1500s, where it was considered a drink of the “infidels or heathens”.

In 1600, Pope Clement VIII (1536-1605) was asked by a group of priests to ban the drink for good in all Catholic regions. However, the Pope tried a cup, liked it and declared it a Christian beverage by baptizing it. After this coffee began spreading throughout Europe and the rest of the Western hemisphere.



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Information sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_coffee
https://web.archive.org/web/20110322043749/
http://www.newpartisan.com/home/suave-molecules-of-mocha-coffee-chemistry-and-civilization.html

Photo Credits / Sources:

By Unknown contemporary author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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